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Location: Vero Beach, Florida, United States

My name is Pat and I live in Florida. My skin will never be smooth again and my hair will never see color. I enjoy collecting autographs and playing in Paint Shop Pro.,along with reading and writing. Sometimes, I enjoy myself by doing volunteer "work" helping celebrities at autograph shows. I love animals and at one time I did volunteer work for Tippi Hedren's Shambala Preserve.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Beyond the Wild River

Beyond the Wild River by Sarah Maine.
Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: Atria Books (April 18, 2017)
ISBN-10: 1501126954


 

Amazon Review
A highly atmospheric and suspenseful historical novel, set in the 1890s about a Scottish heiress who unexpectedly encounters her childhood friend in North America, five years after he disappeared from her family’s estate the night of a double murder.
Nineteen-year-old Evelyn Ballantyre has rarely strayed from her family’s estate in the Scottish Borderlands, save for the occasional trip to Edinburgh, where her father, a respected magistrate, conducts his business—and affairs of another kind. Evelyn has always done her duty as a daughter, hiding her boredom and resentment behind good manners—so when an innocent friendship with a servant is misinterpreted by her father as an illicit union, Evelyn is appalled.
Yet the consequence is a welcome one: she is to accompany her father on a trip to North America, where they’ll visit New York City, the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago, and conclude with a fishing expedition on the Nipigon River in Canada. Now is her chance to escape her cloistered life, see the world, and reconnect with her father.
Once they’re on the Nipigon, however, Evelyn is shocked to discover that their guide is James Douglas, the former stable hand and her one-time friend who disappeared from the estate after the shootings of a poacher and a gamekeeper. Many had assumed that James had been responsible, but Evelyn never could believe it. Now, in the wilds of a new world, far from the constraints of polite society, the truth about that day, James, and her father will be revealed…to stunning consequences.


Well this was a bit different, and I enjoyed it!
They kept the answers slow in coming but the rest of the story wasn't bad.  Atmospheric, and well described how a young lady is raised and expected to act "back in the day".  And then dropping them in a nearly unexplored forest where conveniences are far apart and very small. I would call it a shock to the system to go from one sort of life to another.. and still stay well dressed like they aren't in the wilds of a forest with animals and mud and raging rivers.
Not a bad book.  I read it while I had no electricity from the hurricane! 

Friday, September 08, 2017

The Sleepwalker

The Sleepwalker by Chris Bohjalian.
Hardcover: 304 pages
Publisher: Doubleday;(January 10, 2017)
ISBN-10: 038553891X



Amazon Review
When Annalee Ahlberg goes missing, her children fear the worst. Annalee is a sleepwalker whose affliction manifests in ways both bizarre and devastating. Once, she merely destroyed the hydrangeas in front of her Vermont home. More terrifying was the night her older daughter, Lianna, pulled her back from the precipice of the Gale River bridge. The morning of Annalee's disappearance, a search party combs the nearby woods. Annalee's husband, Warren, flies home from a business trip. Lianna is questioned by a young, hazel-eyed detective. And her little sister, Paige, takes to swimming the Gale to look for clues. When the police discover a small swatch of fabric, a nightshirt, ripped and hanging from a tree branch, it seems certain Annalee is dead, but Gavin Rikert, the hazel-eyed detective, continues to call, continues to stop by the Ahlbergs' Victorian home. As Lianna peels back the layers of mystery surrounding Annalee's disappearance, she finds herself drawn to Gavin, but she must ask herself: Why does the detective know so much about her mother? Why did Annalee leave her bed only when her father was away? And if she really died while sleepwalking, where was the body?
     Conjuring the strange and mysterious world of parasomnia, a place somewhere between dreaming and wakefulness, The Sleepwalker is a masterful novel from one of our most treasured storytellers.


Well.. this was a decent read.. and!...a truly surprise ending!!  You have a suspicion but you won't be right lol.
With the Hurricane almost here I am not much in a mood to write about it.. so I hope Amazon did a good job. I was good enough for me to read the book!

Sunday, August 27, 2017

An American Betrayal:Cherokee Patriots and the Trail of Tears

An American Betrayal: Cherokee Patriots and the Trail of Tears, by Daniel Blake Smith.
Hardcover: 336 pages
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.;(November 8, 2011)
ISBN-10: 0805089551


 

“The story of the Cherokee Nation is a study in suffering, displacement, and the determination of a people to carry on despite brutal government policies that culminated in the ‘Trail of Tears,' President Andrew Jackson's 1834 policy of ‘removal' that saw nearly 4,000 of the 16,000 Cherokees die on their forced migration from North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, and Alabama to the Oklahoma Territory. Smith opens his thoughtful, concise and detailed study of this brutal chapter in the age of Jackson with a stirring account of the assassination of three Cherokee leaders--Elias Boudinot, Major Ridge, and his son, John Ridge--by Cherokee political rivals…The personalities, political realities, and murderous resentments that stemmed from that treaty make for engrossing reading and a vivid evocation of how the Cherokees' options dwindled until no promising choices for this strong and cohesive people remained.” ―PW
“Is a patriot's duty to demand the absolute rights of his or her people to the end? Or is it more heroic to negotiate the best possible terms when faced with an inevitable defeat? This troubling question hangs heavy over Daniel Blake Smith's intriguing An American Betrayal, a detailed history of the Trail of Tears, the brutal forced relocation of the Cherokee people from their ancestral homeland in the southeast to the western territory that is now Oklahoma.” ―Shelf Awareness
“A vivid new history of the 19th-century Cherokee removal and the Trail of Tears. . . . The difference between Smith's account and other similar histories is the emphasis on infighting within the Cherokee leadership, who faced a difficult choice: Should they fight the forced removal by facing massive armies assembled by the American government, or negotiate the best possible terms while relocating peaceably? Neither answer was obviously correct, giving the narrative a tension that Smith develops skillfully. Cherokee leaders such as John Ross, Elias Boudinot, John Ridge and Major Ridge come alive on the page. Numerous little-known Caucasians also emerge as brave defenders of Cherokee humanitarian and land rights. . . . Well-written, well-researched.” ―Kirkus

Yet another book about Native Americans and their treatment by the Europeans that felt the land and all in should be theirs, and that the Natives should be extinguished or pushed aside.

Isn't it strange how so many of us, today, say things like, "why do I have to dial 1 for English! This is America!"... think about it.  How many, that came to America learned the NATIVE LANGUAGE?.. not many.

I don't have a great memory for what I learned in school about how the Native Americans were treated.. or why.  I am making up for it now.  But no matter what I learn, I constantly tell myself, "this is history, and we can't change history." But, I also think... I thought we all were supposed to LEARN from history and not repeat it, and make it better.  Smh. That's another thing I've learned.. very few have learned from it.. and many things never seem to change.

Amazon had good reviews of what the book is about, so I will just leave everyone with a small piece from the book....

"May 17th, 1836, the Senate approved the treaty of New Echota by 1 vote more than the 2/3rds majority required.  A week later, Jackson signed it into law. Under the terms of the Treaty of New Echota, the Cherokee Nation , by May 1838, had to give up it's lands in Alabama, Georga, North Carolina and Tennessee and leave for present-day Oklahoma. The Cherokee's had 2 yrs. to leave."

All because the Europeans wanted what the Cherokee Indians had.  Their land. During the actual Trail of Tears thousands of Cherokee died.

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Britt-Marie Was Here

Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman.
Publisher: Sceptre (1805)
ASIN: B01N1ETC6C



The New York Times bestselling author of A Man Called Ove and My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry “returns with this heartwarming story about a woman rediscovering herself after a personal crisis…fans of Backman will find another winner in these pages” (Publishers Weekly).
Britt-Marie can’t stand mess. A disorganized cutlery drawer ranks high on her list of unforgivable sins. She is not one to judge others—no matter how ill-mannered, unkempt, or morally suspect they might be. It’s just that sometimes people interpret her helpful suggestions as criticisms, which is certainly not her intention.
But hidden inside the socially awkward, fussy busybody is a woman who has more imagination, bigger dreams, and a warmer heart that anyone around her realizes.
When Britt-Marie walks out on her cheating husband and has to fend for herself in the miserable backwater town of Borg—of which the kindest thing one can say is that it has a road going through it—she finds work as the caretaker of a soon-to-be demolished recreation center. The fastidious Britt-Marie soon finds herself being drawn into the daily doings of her fellow citizens, an odd assortment of miscreants, drunkards, layabouts. Most alarming of all, she’s given the impossible task of leading the supremely untalented children’s soccer team to victory. In this small town of misfits, can Britt-Marie find a place where she truly belongs?
Funny and moving, sweet and inspiring, Britt-Marie Was Here celebrates the importance of community and connection in a world that can feel isolating.


This is a follow-up to My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry.  It follows one of the characters in that book named, Britt-Marie.
Once again this is not my normal reading material, but I found I enjoyed both of the books very much, and kept wanting to pick it up .  To anyone who read the first book (and it actually isn't a "series") and enjoyed it.. you will wind up liking this book on Britt-Marie.
I will say, for my own particular taste, and although I liked the ending, there are more things I would have liked seen happen for the ending. But everyone will have their own feelings about that.
Read these books, even if they aren't what you generally read.  They are fast reading and very much will hit your heart.

Tuesday, August 08, 2017

The Betrayal of Trust

The Betrayal of Trust by Susan Hill.

Paperback: 368 pages
Publisher: The Overlook Press;(October 30, 2012)
ISBN-10: 1468300652




Amazon:

The Betrayal of Trust. The English town of Lafferton is ravaged by flash floods. A shallow grave is exposed; the remains of missing teenager Harriet Lowther have been uncovered. Harriet was the daughter of a prominent local businessman, and her death twenty years before had led to her mother’s suicide.
Cold cases are always tough, and in this mystery in the enduringly popular series, Chief Superintendent Simon Serrailler must confront his most grisly, dangerous, and complex case yet. Susan Hill’s understanding of the human heart, her brilliance when evoking characters, and her tremendous powers of storytelling come into full force in The Betrayal of Trust.


 

Pretty good read.  Nice (very nice) short (very short), chapters!  Short chapters always make me read "just a little more" because I know I can end when a new chapter begins instead of in the middle of a chapter.

Susan Hill, is of course, most noted for The Woman in Black. (A Daniel Radcliff movie)

I have found out that The Betrayal of Trust is  just one of a number of books she has written using Chief Superintendent Simon Serrailler.  I may read another if I can come across one that is in the Thrift Shops. (Too many books here that are unread!).

This is a Cold Crime Mystery.  Very well written.  She introduces other people who seem to have no connection at all, and it seems she is telling more than one story.. but of course, she is not.

A storm uproots a tree.. along with some old bones.  (this is where you hear creepy music).. Upon  working the scene they come across more bones to a second person. Hmmm. Two dead bodies... not good.  It winds up being a 16 year old "missing person".  And it builds from there.... you will have to read it if you want to know the whole mystery!

Monday, July 31, 2017

Famous Indians: A Collection of short Biographies  by The Interior of Indian Affairs.


Amazon
Warriors, statesmen, prophets and scholars,--the firmest of friends and most formidable of foes--there are heroes and heroines of many kinds in the often tragic yet inspiring saga of North American Indians. Many of the Indian personalities whose lives are briefly described here were Chiefs--some of them have become famous around the world. All were leaders in a great struggle to preserve treasured lands and lifeways. With their tribesmen, they are inseparably linked to our country's history from its earliest beginnings through generations of growth. Biographies (most including portraits or photographs) include Powhatan, Pocohantas, Massasoit, King Philip, Pope, Joseph Brant, Pontiac, Sacajawea, Tecumseh, Sequoyah, John Ross, Black Hawk, Osceola, Cochise, Seattle, Red Cloud, Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Wovoka, Joseph, Quanah Parker, and Geronimo.


In an 8x10, double column format, this was, as they say, short and sweet.

The Biographies were only 1 or 2 pages long and yet... I read of some Famous Indians that I had not  heard of in the books I have already read.   I am finding there are so many books out on the "western Indians", that I will have to search for some on the Eastern Indians.   I have already learned there were many tribes I never  heard of because with all the killing they came extinct. Not a very nice word.. but true.

It is so ironic that in today's world we invite people from other countries to come and live here, share all we have!  When, back when man discovered America and the Indians said, "come and live  here and share what we have", the "new American", with all his greed, could not "share".. they wanted it all... and took it all.  

I read the books about Indians now... I know I cannot change anything of their past, or our past...  I just wonder why the lesson of Greed cannot be learned?

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Indian Heroes and Great Chieftains

Indian Heroes and Great Chieftains by Charles A. Eastman.

Paperback: 144 pages
Publisher: Dover Publications;(November 2, 2011)
ISBN-10: 0486296083


 

 

Raised as a Santee Sioux in the 1860s and 1870s, Charles A. Eastman (Ohiyesa) wrote eleven books in which he attempted to correct misapprehensions whites had about Indians and to bring the two races closer together.
In the present volume he offers biographical sketches of 15 great Indian leaders, most of them Sioux and some of them, like Red Cloud and Rain-in-the-Face, friends and acquaintances of the author. In vivid vignettes Eastman captures the character, achievements and historic importance of such leaders as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Little Crow, Chief Joseph, and Spotted Tail.
Enhanced with 12 portraits, these inspiring pieces will be of great interest to students of American Indian culture and history as well as to anyone who enjoys reading about the larger-than-life figures who dominated Indian life in the second half of the nineteenth century.


This book may be small, but it is mighty.

Much in the book I have read before in other books, but this is short and sweet and written by someone who actually met most of the Indians you are to read about.  You can't get anymore information then from one who was there, even if it was towards the end .

Eastman other books are sold in a collection, which I could never afford but.. there are some of them out by Dover in this small size.  There are at least 2 others I hope to get and add to this one. 

Not everyone is interested in the past of our Native Americans, but more people should be. (that's just in my opinion.)

Anyway.. loved the book.  If you are inclined to read about the Indians I highly recommend this book.

Friday, July 28, 2017

My grandmother asked me to tell you she's sorry.

My Grandmother asked me to tell you she's sorry. by Fredrik Backman. 

Paperback: 372 pages 
Publisher: Washington Square Press;(April 5, 2016) 
ISBN-10: 1501115073


















Amazon: Elsa is seven years old and different. Her grandmother is seventy-seven years old and crazy—as in standing-on-the-balcony-firing-paintball-guns-at-strangers crazy. She is also Elsa’s best, and only, friend. At night Elsa takes refuge in her grandmother’s stories, in the Land-of-Almost-Awake and the Kingdom of Miamas, where everybody is different and nobody needs to be normal. When Elsa’s grandmother dies and leaves behind a series of letters apologizing to people she has wronged, Elsa’s greatest adventure begins. Her grandmother’s instructions lead her to an apartment building full of drunks, monsters, attack dogs, and old crones but also to the truth about fairy tales and kingdoms and a grandmother like no other.

 I have to admit it, I don't remember what made me get this book. It's different from anything I normally read, but in many ways I really liked it. Parts were very sad, and with my depression I thought to put it down, but I didn't and there was only one small part that made me think of my son Thom and cry. Otherwise.. this is a good read. 

 It's mostly about a 7 year old girl that believes the fairy stories her grandma tells her. She loves her Grandmother, but shortly into the book Grandma dies. Her grandmother leaves her an adventure to do for her. It consists of delivering letters to the people in the house where she lives. One is called "the monster", who really scares her. As the story goes along you learn the other peoples lives and how they all connect to the grandmother.. honestly it was interesting, and makes you realize how well of you are in comparison. So.. yes I would recommend this book. But I cannot leave with the blurb that so reminded me of my son: 

"This gets tricky, from a narrative perspective, because the people who reach the end of their days must leave others who have to live our their days without them. It is very, very difficult to be the one who has to stay behind and live without them. "

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Crazy Horse

Crazy Horse (The Life Behind the Legend) by Mike Sajna
Hardcover: 367 pages
Publisher: Castle Books (October 8, 2009)
ISBN-10: 0785820361

    

From the Inside Flap
The northern Great Plains at the time of Crazy Horse's birth, around 1839 or 1840, were still wide-open buffalo country well known only to a few white traders and trappers. But before the Oglala Lakota war chief was two years old, the first white emigrants appeared on their way to Oregon, launching one of the greatest mass migrations in history and setting the stage for the end of the freedom plains tribes had known. Even as Crazy Horse was becoming one of the Lakota's most renowned warriors, many of his people had already given up their way of life and moved to reservations established by whites who saw them as a hindrance to progress. Those, like Crazy Horse, who chose to follow the old ways soon found themselves confronting an enemy whose might and tactics often were beyond their comprehension and whose goal was their destruction.This poignant book sheds new light on the life and death of one of the greatest Native American leaders, "one of the bravest of the brave," in the struggle against the westward movement of white settlers. Author Mike Sajna reveals Crazy Horse to have been not only an intelligent war chief with the good of his people at heart but also an ardent lover and cautious warrior who at times made mistakes and was as frightened as anyone when it came to confronting death. Sajna portrays Crazy Horse as a quiet, shy person who avoided attention off the battlefield but nevertheless inspired awe, excitement, jealousy, and fear. From his childhood when he showed courage capturing a wild horse to his first fights with the Pawnee and Shoshone, it was clear that Crazy Horse would become a fierce warrior. And yet he was also a tender man who was almost killed pursuing the woman he loved. Together with Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse led the great Sioux-Cheyenne Uprising of 1876?77, which reached its high point on June 25, 1876, with the destruction of Colonel George Armstrong Custer and more than 250 men of the Seventh Cavalry at Little Big Horn. The surrender less than a year later of Crazy Horse and his people was considered, even by his contemporaries, an epochal event in the history of the Plains Indian wars and the West. This meticulously researched biography goes a long way in separating the facts from the many myths that cloud Crazy Horse's life, while at the same time placing him firmly within the context of his times.

So... This book took me a long time to read.  Many reasons why, but one of them is NOT that I didn't want to read about Crazy Horse. 
However good and informative this book is... barely any of it tells me much about Crazy Horse.
In the beginning the author admits that information on Crazy Horse is very limited to only a few "facts" and much from old Indian lore.  Therefore, it winds up that the only "facts" are mostly in the last 3 chapters of the book, which surround his being in the fight that kills Custer, and the final chapter on how Crazy Horse dies. All other information is declared "unconfirmed".  sigh.
I was disappointed that very little is known about Crazy Horse, but if one has not read other books about Native Americans, back when White man took over then this book would be informative.
I was determined to read all the book just in case more information I had not read before might show up.  And some did.
One exciting book title showed up and when I searched it on Amazon I know I want all the information written by the author , A Eastman, on the Indians.  The main book being titled Indian Heroes and Great Chieftains. But of course I want what I can't afford! (nothing new there!) Click the link.. don't laugh too hard!

[ Indian Heroes and Great Chieftains[ INDIAN HEROES AND GREAT CHIEFTAINS ] By Eastman, Charles Alexander

Sunday, June 11, 2017

The Lance and the Shield

The Lance and the Shield (The Life and Times of Sitting Bull) by Robert M. Utley.

Hardcover: 413 pages
Publisher: Henry Holt & Co (June 1, 1992)
ASIN: B001XGEX6M



 



"His narrative is griping....Mr. Utley transforms Sitting Bull, the abstract, romanticized icon and symbol, into a flesh-and-blood person with a down-to-earth story....THE LANCE AND THE SHIELD clears the screen of the exaggerations and fantasies long directed at the name of Sitting Bull."
THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW
Reviled by the United States government as a troublemaker and a coward, revered by his people as a great warrior chief, Sitting Bull has long been one of the most fascinating and misunderstood figures in American history. Now, distinguished historian Robert M. Utley has forged a compelling new portrait of Sitting Bull, viewing the man from the Lakota perspective for the very first time to render the most unbiased and historically accurate biography of Sitting Buil to date.


After reading "Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee", this book on Sitting Bull is no surprise that it too is sad.  But, always something to learn when you read these books.

I found Sitting  Bull to be much more then a Warrior.  He was "head of a household".  He cared for all his people.  Once again the "intruders" into a land of Natural Born Americans, mistreats him and all Indians, like THEY are the intruders.  You really get a sense of how many "lies" (broken truths) the Lakota (Sioux) and others had to endure.

I truly wonder why more History is not taught in schools. It is a HUGE part of American History.  But then,... it shows how the immigrants treated them.  How the lied to them.  How the took everything from them.  Mother Earth, no longer was allowed to care for them.  They were taught to be useless and hopeless, and to have the "government take care of them".   Today it's called "welfare" and those on it are told to get off their butts and go to work... yet, back then they told the Indians, "we will care for you for all we have taken from you."..  It would seem some things never change. 

I do recommend this book. And the book of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.   I give high praise for the authors for putting out the books so others can learn of the most horrid (and seemingly forgotten) of Genocides. 



Sunday, April 23, 2017

Bury My Heat at Wounded Knee

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown.
Hardcover
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (1617)

487 pages.
ASIN: B01JXQNN28

(Book 13)

Immediately recognized as a revelatory and enormously controversial book since its first publication in 1971, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is universally recognized as one of those rare books that forever changes the way its subject is perceived. Now repackaged with a new introduction from bestselling author Hampton Sides to coincide with a major HBO dramatic film of the book, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is Dee Brown's classic, eloquent, meticulously documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the nineteenth century. A national bestseller in hardcover for more than a year after its initial publication, it has sold over four million copies in multiple editions and has been translated into seventeen languages.

Using council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions, Brown allows great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the series of battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them and their people demoralized and decimated. A unique and disturbing narrative told with force and clarity, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee changed forever our vision of how the West was won, and lost. It tells a story that should not be forgotten, and so must be retold from time to time.
 
There is not a lot I can say about this "history" book. Some of it we have heard or read about over the years.
The first 12 pages of this book is more then heartbreaking.  The people who came to this country were, in my opinion, truly "sick of mind"... sadly, some things never change.   Greed.

Quoting from the book cover:
"Traditional texts glory in our nation's western expansion, the great conquest of the virgin frontier.  But how did the original Americans... the Dakota, Nez Perce, Utes, Poncas, Cheyenne, Navaho, Apache, and others... feel about the coming of the white man, the expropriation of their land, the destruction of their way of life?  What happened to Geronimo, Chief Joseph, Cochise, Red Cloud, Little Wolf, and Sitting Bull as their people were killed or driven onto reservations during decades of broken promises, oppression, and war?
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is a documented account of the systematic plunder, of the American Indians during the second half of the nineteenth century, battle by battle, massacre by massacre, broken treaty by broken treaty.Here for the first time is their side of the story.  We can see their faces, hear their voices as they tried desperately to live in peace and harmony with the white man."

This is one of those rare books that will  have to be pried out of my cold dead hands.  That's all I can say.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Cheech is not my Real Name.. But don't Call me Chong

Cheech, Is not my Real Name ...but don't call me Chong! by Cheech Marin.

Hardcover: 272 pages
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing;(March 14, 2017)
ISBN-10: 145559234X




 

The long-awaited memoir from a counterculture legend.

Cheech Marin came of age at an interesting time in America and became a self-made counterculture legend with his other half, Tommy Chong. This insightful memoir delves into how Cheech dodged the draft, formed one of the most successful comedy duos of all time, became the face of the recreational drug movement with the film Up in Smoke, forged a successful solo career with roles in The Lion King and, more recently, Jane the Virgin, and became the owner of the most renowned collection of Chicano art in the world.

Written in Cheech's uniquely hilarious voice, this memoir will take you to new highs.

My girlfriend Cathy bought me this book for my birthday.  Cheech had been on shows promoting the book and it was being said that it was written with much humor.  I figured I needed some humor and mentioned the book and the next thing I know there it is!

The book IS written with humor. 

I can't say I followed his whole career so it was interesting to read that I knew more of his career than I thought I knew.  And still much I didn't know. It was a good story if a rise to fame and the good and bad that comes with it.  I did have one disappointment.. I knew drugs were involved with Cheech and Chong, but for whatever reason I thought it was more Chong, then Cheech.  It probably was but the disappointment (for ME.) was to hear that many still use some.  But that's just me.  I never felt that anyone needed "help" to enjoy yourself or to be happy.  To me, that's a false happiness.   So.. whatever... I still enjoyed the book and thin "Cheech" did a lot of good to make people happy.  That's got to be a good feeling for all comedians... making others happy.

Thanks Cheech.  And although you thought Cheech and  Chongs Corsican Brothers was your worst movie.. I loved it!

 

 

 

 

Saturday, April 01, 2017

The Book of the Dead

Book of the Dead by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child.
Paperback: 621 pages
Publisher: Warner; P edition (2007)
ISBN-10: 0446618500



Amazon review
An FBI agent, rotting away in a high-security prison for a murder he did not commit...
His brilliant, psychotic brother, about to perpetrate a horrific crime...
A young woman with an extraordinary past, on the edge of a violent breakdown...
An ancient Egyptian tomb with an enigmatic curse, about to be unveiled at a celebrity-studded New York gala...

This book took me a long time to read.. NOT because I wasn't enjoying it though.  Life got in the way.  But I finally finished it  and can say I still enjoyed it.
I came to find out that the main characters did 2 books before this one.  It didn't seem to bother the reading of this book. I thought about reading the other two books, but looked around at all the books I have here and decided to not push my luck. 
There was a multitude of "mysteries" going on at once.
Why was the FBI agent in prison?
Who stole the diamonds and sent them back all crushed?
Why were people who went into the tomb being found dead? 
To find out the answers.. you'll have to read the book!

Monday, March 06, 2017

Let the Mountains Talk, Let the Rivers Run

Let the Mountains Talk, Let the Rivers Run: A Call to Those Who Would Save the Earth  by David Brower (1995).

(Book 10 for 2017)

Paperback: 208 pages
Publisher: New Society Publishers; 2nd edition (April 1, 2000)
ISBN-10: 0865714118






Amazon:

This is the testament of one of the few authentic sages of our time. Brower's voice is passionate, perfectly cadenced, humorous, and very wise. And original: while most writers point to where we are, this one draws the map.?Edward O. Wilson, author, The Diversity of Life and Naturalist

Credited with galvanizing an entire generation of environmentalists in the 60's, David Brower, the highly respected "archdruid" of the modern environmental movement, recalls with wit and wisdom his 50 years of controversial activism and offers an inspired strategy for the next generation of "those who would save the Earth."

In this intelligent and engaging chronicle of his years as an agitator for the planet, Brower points out the irony that since the first Earth Day 25 years ago, we've lost one-seventh of the world's productive land to pollution, clear cutting, and pavement-and our population has doubled! From the politics of preserving the environment and how to use New York-style PR to save tigers and dolphins, to reengineering cities, the future of hypercars, and his vision for the Earth Corps, Brower takes us on a sweeping journey of what has been and what could be if we apply CPR (Conservation, Preservation, Restoration) to our wounded world. Printed on entirely tree-free kenaf paper, Let the Mountains Talk, Let the Rivers Run follows its own prescription for saving the world's forests.

This book is about saving our environment.  Animals, Land, Air, and Water... if you have no interest in the Earth we live on then a book such as this will never go on your TBR list.

I found parts I want to share.. just in case it matters..



(pg. 16)  What happened? Sometimes we have been greedy and unthinking, but at other times the road to environmental disaster  has been paved with good intentions.  Too often in what we do, we fail to consider the two most important things: the cost to the future, and the cost to the Earth. We can be very clever, we humans, but sometimes not so smart.

(pg. 24)

Consider what my friend Justice William O. Douglas once told President Franklin D. Roosevelt: Andy government bureau more than ten years old should be abolished, because after that it becomes more concerned with its image than with its mission.

(pg 59)

What we need in these perilous times is  consummate negotiator between the Earth and its human predators.

(pg 94)

You don't know how to fix the holes in our ozone layer.

You don't know how to bring salmon back up a dead stream.

You don't know how to bring back and animal now extinct.

And you can't bring back the forests that once grew where there is now desert.

If you don't know how to fix it, Please stop breaking it!

(pg 126)

We need to tire of trashing wildness.  It's not making us happy.  It's not making us healthy.  It is making us miserable and despairing.  Killing trees, habitat, and animals and separating ourselves from nature is making us all a bit crazy.  We nee to save the wild in order to save ourselves.

(pg 131)

In wilderness is the preservation of the world.

(pg133)

Nevertheless, I concluded that our own major wilderness areas in North America are wilder than anything in the Galapagos, although our wildlife will never be as untroubled by people.  Our wilderness will remain wilder so long as we stop chopping away at it. That said, let's remember that only about 4 percent of the United States is designated wilderness, and half of this is in Alaska. Loopholes abound in the legal language protecting these  remnants, and each generation must review the gems left it by the generation before, and be ready to guard the house against burglars.  The well-traveled Sierra and the lonely Bob Marshall Wilderness in Montana, according to an army study for World War II, are the only two places in the Lower Forty-eight where you can get more than ten miles away from a road.

(pg 178)

In the not so distant past, I saw Murray's remark on commitment serve almost as religion for the people, including me, who helped keep dams our of Dinosaur National Monument, the Yukon, and the Grand Canyon, who helped keep loggers with itchy axes out of Olympic National Park, who helped ban DDT, who helped establish the National Wilderness Preservation System and additions  to the National Park System in the North Cascades, Kings Canyon, the Redwoods, Great Basin , at Point Reyes, and the Golden Gate, Cape Cod, Fire Island.

   We helped do all this with a Sierra Club membership less than one-tenth of its present size.  Even our success in gaining passage of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 was accomplished with a far smaller club than now exists.

  There are now millions of dues-paying environmentalists in the United States alone.  Some count the number at 10 million.  There are more; they just haven't signed up yet.  But whatever the number, they don't seem to have near the power they should.



This is the type of book that is totally up to the person who realizes they have an interest in the destruction of our World, and into Americas portion of it all.

Thursday, March 02, 2017

The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches

The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches by Alan Bradley.
Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher: Bantam (December 30, 2014)
ISBN-10: 0385344066

(Book 9 for 2017)


On a spring morning in 1951, eleven-year-old chemist and aspiring detective Flavia de Luce gathers with her family at the railway station, awaiting the return of her long-lost mother, Harriet. Yet upon the train’s arrival in the English village of Bishop’s Lacey, Flavia is approached by a tall stranger who whispers a cryptic message into her ear. Moments later, he is dead, mysteriously pushed under the train by someone in the crowd. Who was this man, what did his words mean, and why were they intended for Flavia? Back home at Buckshaw, the de Luces’ crumbling estate, Flavia puts her sleuthing skills to the test. Following a trail of clues sparked by the discovery of a reel of film stashed away in the attic, she unravels the deepest secrets of the de Luce clan, involving none other than Winston Churchill himself. Surrounded by family, friends, and a famous pathologist from the Home Office—and making spectacular use of Harriet’s beloved Gipsy Moth plane, Blithe Spirit—Flavia will do anything, even take to the skies, to land a killer.
Wow! I forgot how much I enjoyed Flavia  and her chemistry and her very special family!   This is book 6 in the series and all of them have been totally enjoyable!
This book had a bit of sadness to it and yet it didn't slow down.  Quite a few family secrets and surprises in this one!
If you've read any of them I suggest you keep reading.  And, if you haven't read any of this series I think you would enjoy them.. It all begins with Sweetness At the Bottom of the Pie...
I still love t hat Favia named her bicycle! (I named mine too! Mine was Nellie Belle )
There are two more yet to read but one has so many choices that I now can no longer make up my mind! lol

Sunday, February 26, 2017

When Falcons Fall

When Falcons Fall by C.S. Harris.
Paperback: 384 pages
Publisher: Berkley;(March 7, 2017)
ISBN-10: 0451471172

(Book 8 for 2017)


Ayleswick-on-Teme, 1813. Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin, and his wife, Hero, have come to this deceptively peaceful Shropshire village to honor a slain friend. But when the body of a young widow is found on the banks of the river Teme, the village’s inexperienced new magistrate turns to Sebastian for help. Sebastian soon realizes that Emma Chance was hiding her true identity, and she was not the first beautiful young woman in the village to be murdered. Also troubling are the machinations of Lucien Bonaparte, the estranged brother of the megalomaniac French Emperor Napoléon. Held captive under the British government’s watchful eye, Bonaparte is restless, ambitious, and treacherous.
Home to the eerie ruins of an ancient monastery, Ayleswick reveals itself to be a dark and dangerous place with a violent past that may be connected to Sebastian’s own unsettling origins. And as he faces his most diabolical opponent ever, he is forced to consider what malevolence he’s willing to embrace in order to destroy a killer
.


Wow, hard to believe I've read this whole series of books... 11 of them! Number 12 comes out in April.

I find the main characters very likeable and "their" story has progress along with the murder mysteries that they have worked on.  That's not really saying you have to begin at book one, but I did.  So spread them out and I've read them over a few years. I also have to mention that it's one of the few women authors that I read regularly. Not the ONLY one but there are only a few that seem to write murder mysteries.  

So.. it's a very readable series.  Short chapters.  Good characters.  And just plain enjoyable.


Books read so far this year:
1:The Book of Speculation...............Erika Swyler..........(384 pgs)
2:Lost and Gone Forever.................Alex Grecian..........(384 pgs)
3:The Forgotten Room....................Karen White...........(384 pgs)
4:Ruler of the Night ...................David Morell..........(352 pgs)

5:Lost Among the Living.................Simone St. James.......(352 pgs)
6:Guilty Thing..........................Frances Wilson.........(397 pgs)
7:The Inheritance.......................Charles Finch..........(294 pgs)
8:When Falcons Fall.....................C.S. Harris............(355 pgs)

Saturday, February 18, 2017

The Inheritance

The Inheritance by Charles Finch.
Hardcover: 304 pages
Publisher: Minotaur Books (November 1, 2016)
ISBN-10: 1250070422


Charles Lenox has received a cryptic plea for help from an old Harrow schoolmate, Gerald Leigh, but when he looks into the matter he finds that his friend has suddenly disappeared. As boys they had shared a secret: a bequest from a mysterious benefactor had smoothed Leigh’s way into the world after the death of his father. Lenox, already with a passionate interest in detective work, made discovering the benefactor's identity his first case – but was never able to solve it.
Now, years later, Leigh has been the recipient of a second, even more generous bequest. Is it from the same anonymous sponsor? Or is the money poisoned by ulterior motives? Leigh’s disappearance suggests the latter, and as Lenox tries, desperately, to save his friend’s life, he’s forced into confrontations with both the most dangerous of east end gangs and the far more genteel denizens of the illustrious Royal Society. When someone close to the bequest dies, Lenox must finally delve deep into the past to uncover at last the identity of the person who is either his friend’s savior – or his lethal enemy.

This was an enjoyable read. Obviously a much faster read than my last book.

Charles Finch has written a number of books using the same main character of Charles Lenox, but this was my first read of his detective.  There were some really good twists and turns and as much as the case seems solved with still chapters to read.. it comes up with enough to be sure they cover every little thing along the way.
Gerald Leigh, the school mate he is helping stays in the background yet when he pops up he is most memorable.

A good quick read  and easy enough to follow that you never forget where you are in the case.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Guilty Thing: A Life of Thomas De Quincey

Guilty Thing: A Life of Thomas De  Quincey by Frances Wilson.

Book 6 for 2017

Hardcover: 416 pages
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (October 4, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0374167303




 

Publishers Weekly Ten Best Nonfiction Books of 2016

Thomas De Quincey was an obsessive. He was obsessed with Wordsworth and Coleridge, whose Lyrical Balladsprovided the script to his life, and by the idea of sudden death. Running away from school to pursue the two poets, De Quincey insinuated himself into their world. Basing his sensibility on Wordsworth’s and his character on Coleridge’s, he forged a triangle of unusual psychological complexity.

Aged twenty-four, De Quincey replaced Wordsworth as the tenant of Dove Cottage, the poet’s former residence in Grasmere. In this idyllic spot he followed the reports of the notorious Ratcliffe Highway murders of 1811, when two families, including a baby, were butchered in their own homes. In his opium-soaked imagination the murderer became a poet while the poet became a murderer. Embedded in On Murder as One of the Fine Arts, De Quincey’s brilliant series of essays, Frances Wilson finds the startling story of his relationships with Wordsworth and Coleridge.

Opium was the making of De Quincey, allowing him to dissolve self-conflict, eliminate self-recrimination, and divest himself of guilt. Opium also allowed him to write, and under the pseudonym “The Opium-Eater” De Quincey emerged as the strangest and most original journalist of his age. His influence has been considerable. Poe became his double; Dostoevsky went into exile with Confessions of an English Opium-Eater in his pocket; and Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde, George Orwell, Alfred Hitchcock, and Vladimir Nabokov were all De Quincey devotees.

There have been other biographies of Thomas De Quincey, but Guilty Thing is the first to be animated by the spirit of De Quincey himself. Following the growth of his obsessions from seed to full flowering and tracing the ways they intertwined, Frances Wilson finds the master key to De Quincey’s vast Piranesian mind. Unraveling a tale of hero worship and revenge, Guilty Thing brings the last of the Romantics roaring back to life and firmly establishes Wilson as one of our foremost contemporary biographers.

 

So...

After reading David Morrell's trilogy, which included a character named Thomas De Quincey. And after my girlfriend in England, Cath, told me he was a real person, I wanted to know about him.    Several months ago I downloaded his Autobiography of Confessions of an Opium Eater, but when I read it, it was only 48 pages, so I thought it wasn't the whole book. I have since found out the "book version" isn't very long either.  I therefore put it on the back burner, so to speak, and forgot about it until recently when I read the third book of Morrell's trilogy, Ruler of the Night.  My interest got sparked again.  So I sent for this book, Guilty Thing: A Life of Thomas De Quincey.

I did find out what parts I read of him in Morrell's novels were true and what was not.

I found out De Quincey added the "De" to his name, it was only Quincey.

He was but 4 foot 11 inches tall.  He had 7 siblings, he loved poetry and taught him self how to speak and write fluent Greek.

De Quincey, was known as the Opium Eater, because he chose to present himself as he really was.  He began on Laudanum drops for a headache and it escalated  and by 1813 he was taking 8,000 drops a day.

His other addictions included books and indebtedness.  Living much of his time on the streets. 

Eventually, he married his servant and had 8 children . 

The book was not easy for me to read.  I am not literate in many long words and the author chose to write in the manor or the literate people such as De Quincey to write the book.  I did persist and did read the entire book, and it was interesting.  It also spoke of the era in which he lived and other authors known in literature of that time.

Not a book for everyone, but surely a book for someone who wanted to know about Thomas De Quincey: the Opium Eater. 

Friday, February 03, 2017

Lost Among the Living

Lost Among the Living by Simone St. James.
(Book 5)
Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher: NAL; 1st edition (April 5, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0451476190


Amazon Review:
England, 1921. Three years after her husband, Alex, disappeared, shot down over Germany, Jo Manders still mourns his loss. Working as a paid companion to Alex's wealthy, condescending aunt, Dottie Forsyth, Jo travels to the family’s estate in the Sussex countryside. But there is much she never knew about her husband’s origins…and the revelation of a mysterious death in the Forsyths’ past is just the beginning…
All is not well at Wych Elm House. Dottie's husband is distant, and her son was grievously injured in the war. Footsteps follow Jo down empty halls, and items in her bedroom are eerily rearranged. The locals say the family is cursed, and that a ghost in the woods has never rested. And when Jo discovers her husband’s darkest secrets, she wonders if she ever really knew him.  Isolated in a place of deception and grief, she must find the truth or lose herself forever.
And then a familiar stranger arrives at Wych Elm House…

I enjoyed this book.  It's a book with family history and secrets.. so, what's not to like? It was fast reading and interesting.  And yes... part of the secrets was a "possible" murder!
It had ghosts... but not overly  used.
It takes place in a old large home with (or without) servants, and it took some unexpected twists and turns.  It also held true to the England of 1921. 
This was a nice break from having detectives solve something. 
I've read one other book by Simone St. James called The Haunting of Maddy Clare, which I enjoyed also.

Sunday, January 29, 2017

Ruler of the Night

Ruler of the Night by David Morrell.

Hardcover: 352 pages
Publisher: Mulholland Books (November 15, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0316307904






The notorious Opium-Eater returns in the sensational climax to David Morrell's acclaimed Victorian mystery trilogy.
1855. The railway has irrevocably altered English society, effectively changing geography and fueling the industrial revolution by shortening distances between cities: a whole day's journey can now be covered in a matter of hours. People marvel at their new freedom.
But train travel brings new dangers as well, with England's first death by train recorded on the very first day of railway operations in 1830. Twenty-five years later, England's first train murder occurs, paralyzing London with the unthinkable when a gentleman is stabbed to death in a safely locked first-class passenger compartment.
In the next compartment, the brilliant opium-eater Thomas De Quincey and his quick-witted daughter, Emily, discover the homicide in a most gruesome manner. Key witnesses and also resourceful sleuths, they join forces with their allies in Scotland Yard, Detective Ryan and his partner-in-training, Becker, to pursue the killer back into the fogbound streets of London, where other baffling murders occur. Ultimately, De Quincey must confront two ruthless adversaries: this terrifying enemy, and his own opium addiction which endangers his life and his tormented soul.


And so ends a really good trilogy. (sigh) 

When I read the first book, and after I told my friend Catherine Russell that I loved the character of Thomas De Quincey, that was in the book, she let me know that Thomas De Quincey was a real person!  He was Thomas De Quincey the Opium Eater. (which is how he is portrayed in the books).  Well, some time ago I got a free download of De Quincey's Confessions of an Opium Eater, but found it was only 48 pages long.  Now, having read all three books I found another book about his life and ordered it. (Guilty Thing: A Life of Thomas De Quincey by Frances   Wilson.)

 



All three books were captivating. 

Murder as a Fine Art

Inspector of the Dead

Ruler of the Night

 



Morrell's words put you in England at the time Scotland Yard needed De Quincey's help.  All of them are so well written, I hate knowing the same characters won't be used again.

If you like "vintage" England for a crime series you should try the books of David Morrell.

Sunday, January 22, 2017

The Forgotten Room

The Forgotten Room by Karen White, Beatriz Williams & Lauren Willig.

Hardcover: 384 pages
Publisher: NAL (January 19, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0451474627




Amazon Review

1945: When the critically wounded Captain Cooper Ravenal is brought to a private hospital on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, young Dr. Kate Schuyler is drawn into a complex mystery that connects three generations of women in her family to a single extraordinary room in a Gilded Age mansion.
Who is the woman in Captain Ravenel's portrait miniature who looks so much like Kate?  And why is she wearing the ruby pendant handed down to Kate by her mother?  In their pursuit of answers, they find themselves drawn into the turbulent stories of Gilded Age Olive Van Alen, driven from riches to rags, who hired out as a servant in the very house her father designed, and Jazz Age Lucy Young, who came from Brooklyn to Manhattan in pursuit of the father she had never known.  But are Kate and Cooper ready for the secrets that will be revealed in the Forgotten Room? 
The Forgotten Room, set in alternating time periods, is a sumptuous feast of a novel brought to vivid life by three brilliant storytellers.


Wow.. this makes 10 books I've read by Karen White over the years!  If you wonder why that surprises me, it's because most of them involve a love story and I am not big into love stories.  It seems however she writes a compelling story around the love story to make them interesting enough for me to enjoy.   In this one there were three generations of mystery to solve along with the love story.  ...and I do like family secrets or discovering information on families.  So this one filled the bill nicely.

I think Karen White books are a good gap filler for me to break away from crime now and then.  So, it that's you.. you may well enjoy this book.  Or.. one of her many other books!

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Lost and Gone Forever

Lost and Gone Forever: by Alex Grecian.

Hardcover: 384 pages
Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons(May 17, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0399176101


 



an Amazon review..

All of my favorite characters are back so immediately upon starting this book I felt as though I was right back with the London Murder Squad...except that nothing was the same. So...in order to truly get into this book you really have to have read all of the others that came before it. There really isn't any other way to truly understand what these characters have gone through and how much they have endured. So...briefly...Walter Day has been held captive by Jack ( the Ripper ) for a year. Hammersmith...a former police associate of Day's...has a private investigator's practice specifically set up by Claire Day...Walter's wife...to find Day. Jack is clever and cruel and sadistic is still killing people. There are other people...specifically hired to kill Jack...they are hired by a powerful secret society...not the police. These books take place in Victorian London so everything is kind of squalid, smelly and vermin filled...plus there are lots of orphans. In those days a penny bought a lot! Jack has messed with Walter Day's head so much that he really doesn't even know who he is any more.

Alex Grecian has now written 5 books of Scotland Yard's Murder Squad.  .. and I have read them all!  He built some really good characters and one gets invested enough to want to keep reading more !

In order the books are:  The Yard,  The Black Country,  The Devil's Workshop, The Harvest Man and Lost and Gone Forever.  In order to really know the characters one should start at the beginning.  Even though they are all new cases, what happens to the main characters changes with each book.  I certainly hope this isn't the last of the Scotland Yard's Murder Squad!

Wednesday, January 04, 2017

The Book of Speculation

The Book of Speculation by Erika Swyler.

Paperback: 384 pages
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin(May 31, 2016)
ISBN-10: 1250055636




An Amazon Best Book Water shrouds the fascinating, often doomed characters of The Book of Speculation. Featuring mermaids, swarms of horseshoe crabs, deadly floods, and the silent secrets of an ancient tarot deck, The Book of Speculation is split like a savory peach between the odd ventures of a traveling carnival in the late 1700s and the modern-day discovery by librarian Simon Watson of an old, handwritten volume containing his grandmother’s name. The water-damaged book may reveal the root of certain mysteries in his family, such as why the women can hold their breath far, far longer than normal, and the inexplicable reason they have all drowned while young women on the exact same date—a date that is only a few days away as the book begins. When Simon’s sister, Enola, unexpectedly returns home, vibrating with an angry sadness Simon has never seen before, Simon dives deeper into the book and the dark waters of their family history, hoping to change what he fears is her destiny. Erika Swyler has written an engrossing literary tale-spinner with an assurance rarely mastered in debut novels, allowing a well-placed detail or a lyrical phrase to paint a character or sketch even as she builds tension like a pro. As Simon grows obsessed with unraveling the secrets in his book, so will you become bewitched by The Book of Speculation.

I picked this book up at a thrift store. The cover read like it was more of a family mystery then anything else.  And it was!  It was a nice break from detective books.  It read a lot like digging up ancestry, but in this case it wasn't just an interest... it turned into fear for life.

I read it pretty quickly so that means it held my interest, and it did have some surprises along the way.

I was never much into "side shows" or Tarot cards, but in this case it worked well.  By the end of the book I was wondering how people put so much belief in Tarot cards..  and made me curious at the same time .  Has anyone ever had the fortune told?

 

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Coffin Road

Coffin Road by Peter May.

Hardcover: 400 pages
Publisher: Quercus (October 4, 2016)
ISBN-10: 1681443899


 

Amazon Review

In his latest mystery set in Scotland and the Outer Hebrides, award-winning author Peter May spins a tale about three disparate cases that may or may not be linked...
On the remote Isle of Harris in Scotland's Outer Hebrides, a man washes up on a deserted beach, hypothermic and completely disoriented. He has no idea who he is or how he got there. The only clue to his condition is a map of the island showing a desolate, ancient path called the Coffin Road. With a sense of dread and no clear idea what lies at the other end, he knows he must follow the trail if he has any hope of discovering his identity.
Meanwhile, homicide detective George Gunn makes the rough ocean crossing to a remote, sea-battered lighthouse on a rock in the northern Atlantic, twenty miles west of the Outer Hebrides, to investigate a brutal murder. Despite its isolation, the tiny island has seen its share of tragedy: more than a century earlier, three lighthouse keepers disappeared, never to be seen or heard from again. And now there is a new tragedy, and Gunn must figure out what happened.
At the same time, a teenage girl lies in her Edinburgh bedroom, desperate to discover the truth about her father's death. Two years after the discovery of the pioneering scientist's suicide note, Karen Fleming still cannot accept that her father would willingly abandon her. And the more she discovers about the nature of his research, the more she suspects that suicide had nothing to do with it.


I am not sure if it's Peter May's writing that I like so much..or.. where he puts me for his story.  I can't say that I like this book "better" then "The Lewis Trilogy" but I know I had no problem in wanting to "read more" each day.

This is a hard review for me.  When my son passed away I was reading a different book. One in which I really thought I could get into.  However, after reading 200 of the 400 pages I could not get into it. I felt as if I was reading the same things over and over.  I don't know if it was the book, or my not being able to put my mind into the book.  And so, this book.. helped somewhat. I knew what was going on and felt that I was able to want to know the outcome.

This is a good stand alone book, but if I had my druthers I would recommend The Lewis Trilogy to anyone who thinks they want to be in a place they never thought they would be.

And so.. I end 2016 having read only 43 books. I thought I would hit 50 but life got in the way.  Maybe 2017 will give me more interesting books to read.  Here is the list of what I read this year.:



1..The Murder Man......................Tony Parsons..........(384 pgs)
2..Strings of Murder.....................Oscar De Muriel.......(406 pgs)
3..The Haunting of Maddy Clare......Simone St. James......(329 pgs)
4..The Vanishing........................Wendy Webb............(304 pgs)
5..Jack Kennedy Elusive Hero........Chris Matthews........(496 pgs)
6..These Few Precious Days..........Christopher Andersen..(336 pgs)


7..Inspector of the Dead..............David Morrell........(352 pgs)
9..Jackie After Jack...................Christopher Andersen.(427 pgs)
10.Empty Mansions....................Bill Dedman..........(456 pgs)
11.Cover of Snow......................Jenny Milchman.......(326 pgs)
12.Things Half in Shadow.............Alan Fin.............(448 pgs)


13.The Lake House.....................Kate Morton.........(512 pgs)
14.Wild Fell.............................Michael Rowe........(180 pgs)
15.Wit and Wisdom of Downton Abbey....Jessica Fellows.....(127 pgs)
16.Uprooted............................Naomi Novik.........(456 pgs)
17.Anatomy of Evil....................Will Thomas.........(336 pgs)
18.House on an Irish Hillside.........Felicity McCoy......(320 pgs)
19.The Silent Sister...................Diane Chamberlain...(368 pgs)


20.Pretty Girls.........................Karin Slaughter.....(416 pgs)

21.The Black Box.......................Michael Connelly....(480 pgs)
22.Cracks in the Sidewalk..............Bette L. Crosby.....(332 pgs)
23.A Memory of Violets.................Hazel Gaynor........(432 pgs)
24.The Midnight Rose...................Lucinda Riley.......(496 pgs)
25.The Likeness........................Tana French.........(466 pgs)


26.Faithful Place.......................Tana French........(400 pgs)
27.Since She Went Away..................David Bell.........(412 pgs)


28.Broken Harbor........................Tana French........(450 pgs)
29.The Burning Room.....................Michael Connelly...(576 pgs)
30.The Buried Giant.....................Kazuo Ishiguro.....(336 pgs)


31.Black Rabbit Hall.....................Eve Chase..........(384 pgs)
32.The Silent Girls......................Eric Rickstad......(416 pgs)
33.The Woman who Walked into the Sea.....Mark D Home....(352 pgs)
34.The Life we Bury......................Allen Eskens.......(303 pgs)
35.Every Dead Thing......................John Connolly......(512 pgs)


36.Carved in Bone........................Jefferson Bass.....(352 pgs)
37.Who Buries the Dead...................C.S. Harris........(352 pgs)
38.The Thirteenth Tale...................Diane Setterfield..(406 pgs)
39.Abomination...........................Colleen Coble......(336 pgs)
40.The Hidden Child......................Camilla Lackberg...(526 pgs)


41.The Uninvited.........................Cat Winters........(343 pgs)
42.The Sound of Glass....................Karen White........(448 pgs)


43.Coffin Road...........................Peter May..........(392 pgs)

So many books...  so little time.